Tag Archives: content management

Jane Austin and Live Tweeting during ‘Death Comes to Pemberley’


P. D. James' clever whodunit "Death Comes to Pemberley"  stars Anna Maxwell Martin ("Bleak House"), Matthew Rhys ("The Americans") is live Tweeting during air time with fans.
P. D. James’ clever whodunit “Death Comes to Pemberley,” based on Jane Austin’s “Pride and Prejudice,” stars Anna Maxwell Martin (“Bleak House”), Matthew Rhys (“The Americans”) in a Masterpiece Theatre live Tweeting event with fans.

Hard to know if Jane Austin were around she  would reach out to fans through Twitter, but Masterpiece Theatre viewers of her work and of P.D. James’ pastiche “Death Comes to Pemberley” are being encouraged to do so tonight (11/2/14).

It’s one thing for major news stations to keep viewers updated via their website with breaking news, or for the major award shows to post winners as they are announced. But more and more TV series are setting aside a night to tweet all kinds of tidbits to their fans. It’s a smart idea, something small businesses should adopt, and a great way to interact with viewers (who represent Nielsen ratings as well as web clicks).

Don’t just watch us, talk to us!

For small businesses, it builds community in a fun way at virtually no cost and will pay back big time down the road.

Continue reading Jane Austin and Live Tweeting during ‘Death Comes to Pemberley’

Build communities, not networks, to woo loyal followers


LinkedIn today has an interesting article on Google+. I know, enough about Google, but you gotta admit they pretty much run the web universe these days. So learn to like ’em or get left in the dust.

Focusing on non-profits’ success with G+, Ronald Honigman explains now the Red Cross struck gold by crafting a visually focused story about the Red Cross and engaged with people who support the organization’s ongoing mission:

“The Red Cross has found success by applying this strategy across each social network and adapting it to suit the nuances and audiences unique to each channel.

It found that visuals tend to receive the highest amount of interactions from its audiences, such as photos from events and volunteers, infographics illustrating the need for more blood donations, and repurposed YouTube videos.

One of the unique aspects of Google+ is that it is tied into an ecosystem, whereas some of the other social platforms are their own standalone communities, says Midkiff.

His advice for other non-profits is to use visuals and other engaging content to drive interactions with your audiences to eventually take advantages of the larger Google+ ecosystem.

Lastly, he recommends that in order to find success with a platform like Google+ make sure your organization has the manpower or infrastructure in place to continually maintain the social network. Without this infrastructure, your organization will have hard time updating and tending to your Google+ page enough to find the success you’re looking for.”

Read more here.